September 2nd, 2014

archaeologicalnews:

image

The mummification technique, which is used to preserve the body after death, has been used by several different civilizations throughout history, including the mummies of Anatolia.

During antiquity and the Middle Ages (5th-15th Century), mummification was a common technique used by the…

September 1st, 2014
August 22nd, 2014
theketodame:

Grilled Balsamic Steak with Blue Cheese Butter

theketodame:

Grilled Balsamic Steak with Blue Cheese Butter

peeblespair:

L’homme qui plantait des arbres

peeblespair:

L’homme qui plantait des arbres

(via redjeep)

ianference:

The various stories of Nikola Tesla getting screwed over by a variety of people in his career - notably Thomas Edison and J. P. Morgan - are many.  This photograph depicts some machinery left on-site at Wardenclyffe - Tesla’s last standing laboratory, and a testament to a man with a vision that was constantly impeded by those around him.  Constructed between 1898 and 1901, Wardenclyffe - a Stanford White-designed laboratory building with a 180-foot tower behind it - was to be Tesla’s main laboratory, and the inventor moved all of his operations into it in 1902.  However, when Morgan - ever putting the increasing of his personal wealth ahead of the betterment of society - discovered in 1904 that Tesla intended not only the wireless transmission of telegraphs, but the wireless transmission of electricity, he pulled his funding.  As the greedy financier pointed out, you couldn’t put a meter on free, wireless electricity for all.  The laboratory was abandoned, and Tesla began to mentally collapse, eventually fading into obscurity and dying in poverty in New York.

ianference:

The various stories of Nikola Tesla getting screwed over by a variety of people in his career - notably Thomas Edison and J. P. Morgan - are many.  This photograph depicts some machinery left on-site at Wardenclyffe - Tesla’s last standing laboratory, and a testament to a man with a vision that was constantly impeded by those around him.  Constructed between 1898 and 1901, Wardenclyffe - a Stanford White-designed laboratory building with a 180-foot tower behind it - was to be Tesla’s main laboratory, and the inventor moved all of his operations into it in 1902.  However, when Morgan - ever putting the increasing of his personal wealth ahead of the betterment of society - discovered in 1904 that Tesla intended not only the wireless transmission of telegraphs, but the wireless transmission of electricity, he pulled his funding.  As the greedy financier pointed out, you couldn’t put a meter on free, wireless electricity for all.  The laboratory was abandoned, and Tesla began to mentally collapse, eventually fading into obscurity and dying in poverty in New York.

(via destroyed-and-abandoned)